Studies

Here you will find current studies on the topic of holistic planned grazing. 

Weißes Schaf, welches auf Weide steht, schaut in Kamera mit Herde im Hintergrund
Author: Otálora et al. (2021)   Paper: Ecological Indicators

Holistic planned sheep grazing management increases spring grass production and soil hard carbon storage

Regenerative agricultural practices, such as rotational grazing with longer rest periods, are intended to improve cropland soil health while profitably providing high quality agricultural products. The objective of this study was to determine the medium-term effects of regenerative grazing in the Basque Country of northern Spain on soil ecosystem services and to evaluate their synergies and trade-offs. Regenerative grazing produced 30% higher spring grass production and 3.6% higher topsoil carbon storage than conventional grazing.

Author:
Xavier Díaz de Otálora, Lur Epelde, Josune Arranz, Carlos Garbisu, Roberto Ruiz, Nerea Mandaluniz
Published:
2021
Paper:
Ecological Indicators
Link/Pdf:
/fileadmin/pdf/Weide/Otolora_et_al_2021-komprimiert.pdf
Kühe weiden auf einer steilen Weide in den Bergen
Author: Spratt et al. (2021)   Paper: Journal of Soil and Water Conservation

Accelerating regenerative grazing to address agricultural, environmental and social challenges.

Regenerative pasture management is an agroecological approach to transforming modern agriculture. With a growing body of research, this approach is increasingly understood as a "win-win-win" for farmers, society and the environment. The paper aims to define regenerative grazing and its benefits, and to sharpen the focus on its rapid expansion.

Author:
Elisabeth Spratt, Jane Jordan, Jonathan Winsten, Pete Huff, Caroline van Schalk, Jane Grimsbo Jewett, Meghan Filbert, Jared Luhman, Erin Meier, Laura Paine
Published:
2021
Paper:
Journal of Soil and Water Conservation
Pages
15-23
Link/Pdf:
/fileadmin/pdf/Weide/Spratt_et_al_2021.pdf
Zwei Pferde rennen in Richtung der Kamera in einer herbstlichen Landschaft
Author: Gosnell et al. (2020)   Paper: Agriculture and Human Values

Half a century of holistic planned grazing: What do the results show?

Holistic rangeland management is based on a proactive approach to managing complexity. Primarily associated with a livestock management approach, it has sparked long-standing and still unresolved debates in rangeland ecology and management. Less explored are the social, cultural, and psychological aspects of grazing management that may hold the key to successful ecological outcomes. This paper describes the key principles of holistic grazing management as developed by wildlife biologist Allan Savory and addresses the long-standing and unresolved controversy surrounding its legitimacy.

Author:
Hannah Gosnell, Kerry Grimm, Bruce E. Goldstein
Published:
2020
Paper:
Agriculture and Human Values
Pages
849–867
Link/Pdf:
https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10460-020-10016-w
Trockener, orangener Boden mit einigen wenigen Pflanzen unter blauem Himmel in Australien
Author: Gosnell et al. (2020)   Paper: Interface Focus

Climate change mitigation as a side effect of regenerative livestock production: insights from Australia and the U.S.

The paper concludes that incorporating holistic decision-making into regenerative livestock practices leads to a range of environmental, economic and social benefits. Mitigation of climate change is only a "side effect".

Author:
Hannah Gosnell, Susan Charnley, Paige Stanley
Published:
2020
Paper:
Interface Focus
Pages
1-14
Link/Pdf:
/fileadmin/pdf/Weide/Gosnell_et_al._2020.pdf
Weißes Lamm steht auf einer grünen Weide und schaut in die Kamera
Author: Rattan Lal (2020)   Paper: Soil Science and Plant Nutrition

Land management for positive impact on food and nutrition security.

The increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration as well as the accumulation of other greenhouse gases have led to a global mean temperature increase of 1°C. Among anthropogenic sources, historical land use and conversion of natural to agricultural ecosystems has been and continues to be an important source. The study shows: The adoption of conservation agriculture, agroforestry, the use of plant charcoal, and the integration of livestock are significant in the fight against climate change and for soil health.

Author:
Rattan Lal
Published:
2020
Paper:
Soil Science and Plant Nutrition
Pages
1-9
Link/Pdf:
/fileadmin/pdf/Weide/Rattan_2020.pdf
Bisons weiden auf einem Hügel unter blauem Himmel
Author: Hillenbrand et al. (2019)   Paper: Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment

Effects of holistically planned bison grazing compared to continuous cattle grazing in South Dakota.

This study evaluates holistically planned grazing outcomes in the shortgrass prairie of the northern Great Plains of North America. Key ecosystem functions of multi-paddocks grazed by bison are compared to those on adjacent ranch paddocks grazed by cattle. Sites on adjacent ranches were paired for sampling by soil type and landscape position. In all paddocks, management practices had been constant for more than a decade. Positive outcomes of multi-paddock grazing include increased fine litter cover, improved water infiltration, two to three times available forage biomass, improved plant composition, decrease in invasive plants, and decrease in bare ground.

Author:
Mimi Hillenbrand, Ry Thompson, Fugui Wang, Steve Apfelbaum, Richard Teague
Published:
2019
Paper:
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment
Pages
156-168
Link/Pdf:
/fileadmin/pdf/Weide/Hillenbrand_et_al._2019-komprimiert.pdf
Zwei Bauern mit ihren Rindern auf trockenem Boden
Author: Peel & Stalmans (2018)   Paper: African Journal of Range and Forage Science

The impact of Holistic Planned Grazing on African rangelands: a case study from Zimbabwe.

Holistic Planned Grazing is expected to have long-term positive impacts on rangelands and improve ecosystem services. Given similar environmental templates but different management, vegetation monitoring and landscape function analysis showed that the pastureland of the Africa Center for Holistic Management in Dimbangombe had significantly better condition (composition, cover, yield, and soil health) than the neighboring pastureland of Sizinda and Monde counties.

Author:
Mike J. S. Peel, Marc Stalmans
Published:
2018
Paper:
African Journal of Range and Forage Science
Pages
23-31
Link/Pdf:
https://bit.ly/3nToImi
Brauner und grüner Acker nebeneinander
Author: W. R. Teague (2018)   Paper: Journal of Animal Science

The management of grazing to restore soil health and farm livelihoods.

The paper is a literature review on the ecological impacts of grazing. The authors conclude that livestock are essential for sustainability and improvement of ecosystem services when properly managed. For example, holistic grazing management helps improve water infiltration, reduce erosion, increase plant biomass, improve nutrient cycling, and sequester atmospheric carbon in newly formed soils. In the study, the increase in soil organic matter was sufficient to provide a net sink of 2 tons of carbon per hectare per year.

Author:
W. R. Teague
Published:
2018
Paper:
Journal of Animal Science
Pages
1519–1530
Link/Pdf:
https://academic.oup.com/jas/article-abstract/96/4/1519/4833918?redirectedFrom=fulltext
Schwarz-weiß gefleckte Kuh steht auf einer Wiese und schaut in die Kamera
Author: Van Amburgh & Cooke (2018)   Paper: Savory Institute

Less stress and more grazing through holistic planned grazing management

This study examines the effects of holistically planned grazing on cows on an organic dairy farm. Over three years, results included an increase in grazing days, a decrease in feed costs, improved profitability, a significant improvement in animal health, and an improvement in milk quality.

Author:
Phillys Van Amburgh, Sheila Cooke
Published:
2018
Paper:
Savory Institute
Pages
1-15
Link/Pdf:
/fileadmin/pdf/Weide/VanAmburgh_Cooke_2018.pdf
Sonne geht unter über einer kargen Steppenlandschaft
Author: Teague et al. (2011)   Paper: Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment

Effects of grazing management on vegetation, soil biota, and soil chemical and physical properties.

To assess whether holistic management with multi-paddock grazing is superior to continuous grazing in terms of resource conservation and restoration, the study examines the effects of multi-paddock grazing with high animal density compared to continuous grazing in north Texas. The study concludes that ranchers who manage their pastures holistically have an advantage in terms of long-term resource conservation and profitability compared to those who practice continuous seasonal grazing.

Author:
W. R. Teague, S. L. Dowhower, S. A. Baker, N. Haile, P. B. DeLaune, D. M. Conover
Published:
2011
Paper:
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment
Pages
310-322
Link/Pdf:
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0167880911000934
Landwirtschaftliche Ackerflächen im Sonnenlicht
Author: Richard T. Conant (2010)   Paper: Integrated Crop Management

Challenges and opportunities for carbon sequestration in grassland systems.

This FAO report by Colorado State University's Richard Conant, editor-in-chief, makes a strong case for grassland restoration as a climate change strategy and "improved grazing management" as one of the most important ways to improve soil carbon stocks.

Author:
Richard T. Conant
Published:
2010
Paper:
Integrated Crop Management
Link/Pdf:
/fileadmin/pdf/Weide/Conant_2010.pdf
Grüne Rasenflächen mit vereinzelten Bäume im Sauerland
Author: Follett & Reed (2021)   Paper: Rangeland Ecology & Management

Soil carbon in grasslands: social benefits and policy implications.

The paper almost studies on grazing lands and carbon sequestration together. It shows that rangelands store important stocks of terrestrial carbon, occupying about 3.6 billion hectares and accounting for about a quarter of potential carbon sequestration in world soils. Subsidence rates from grazing and restored semi-arid savanna are up to 2.75 tons per hectare per year.

Author:
Ronald F. Follett, Debbie A. Reed
Published:
2021
Paper:
Rangeland Ecology & Management
Pages
4-15
Link/Pdf:
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S155074241050006X?via=ihub
Schafherde mit unterschiedlich farbig gemusterten Schafen
Author: Sanjari et al. (2008)   Paper: Australian Journal of Soil Research

Comparison of the effects of continuous and timed grazing systems on soil properties in Queensland

Grazing by livestock has a major impact on soil properties and the carbon and nitrogen cycling of rangeland soils. Grazing practices affect soil properties differently depending on the number of animals and grazing periods. The new holistic grazing management of short intensive grazing followed by a long rest period is already being applied to many pastures in Australia. However, little research has been conducted to date on the effects of this grazing system on soil physical and chemical health. Therefore, this study examines a sheep grazing area in southeast Queensland, Australia, comparing the two grazing systems of continuous and short grazing.

Author:
Gholamreza Sanjari, Hossein Ghadiri, Cyril A. A. Ciesiolka, Bofu Yu
Published:
2008
Paper:
Australian Journal of Soil Research
Pages
348-358
Link/Pdf:
/fileadmin/pdf/Weide/Sanjari_et_al._2008.pdf

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